Ecological and evolutionary significance of resting eggs in marine copepods: past, present, and future studies

@article{Marcus2004EcologicalAE,
  title={Ecological and evolutionary significance of resting eggs in marine copepods: past, present, and future studies},
  author={Nancy H. Marcus},
  journal={Hydrobiologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={320},
  pages={141-152}
}
  • N. Marcus
  • Published 1 March 1996
  • Biology
  • Hydrobiologia
The occurrence of a resting egg phase in the life cycle of marine and freshwater planktonic copepods is well documented and receiving increasing attention by investigators. The species generally occur in coastal marine waters, freshwater ponds and lakes in areas that undergo strong seasonal fluctuations, though examples have been reported for tropical and sub-tropical areas not subject to such extreme fluctuations. Typically such species disappear from the water column for portions of the year… 

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