Ecological and evolutionary dynamics of fig communities

@article{Frank2005EcologicalAE,
  title={Ecological and evolutionary dynamics of fig communities},
  author={Steven A. Frank},
  journal={Experientia},
  year={2005},
  volume={45},
  pages={674-680}
}
  • S. Frank
  • Published 1 July 1989
  • Environmental Science
  • Experientia
I review the status of five topics in fig research: pollen-vector versus seed production, flowering phenology and wasp population dynamics, monoecy versus dioecy, parasite pressure, and fig wasp behavior. I raise several new questions based on recent research on two components of fig reproduction: pollen-donation (male) and seed-production (female) success. I focus on how these two components of reproductive success depend on the flowering phenology of the figs and the population dynamics of… 
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TLDR
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Data from 12 monoecious species of New World figs and their wasp pollinators indicate that fig fruit size, wasp size, and the number of foundresses that pollinate and lay eggs in any given fruit interact in complex but systematic ways to affect the reproductive success of both the wasps and the figs.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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