Ecological Energetics in Early Homo

@article{Pontzer2012EcologicalEI,
  title={Ecological Energetics in Early Homo},
  author={Herman Pontzer},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2012},
  volume={53},
  pages={S346 - S358}
}
  • H. Pontzer
  • Published 3 October 2012
  • Biology
  • Current Anthropology
Models for the origin of the genus Homo propose that increased quality of diet led to changes in ranging ecology and selection for greater locomotor economy, speed, and endurance. Here, I examine the fossil evidence for postcranial change in early Homo and draw on comparative data from living mammals to assess whether increased diet quality has led to selection for improved locomotor performance in other lineages. Body mass estimates indicate early Homo, both males and females, were… 

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