Ecological Developmental Biology: Integrating Epigenetics, Medicine, and Evolution

@inproceedings{Schlichting2009EcologicalDB,
  title={Ecological Developmental Biology: Integrating Epigenetics, Medicine, and Evolution},
  author={Carl D. Schlichting},
  year={2009}
}
3 Citations
Evolution and Development: Molecules
TLDR
Major research themes and approaches in evolutionary developmental biology, commonly referred to as evo-devo, are presented from a molecular perspective.
Behavior genetics and postgenomics
  • E. Charney
  • Biology
    Behavioral and Brain Sciences
  • 2012
TLDR
One of the central claims to emerge from the use of heritability studies in the behavioral sciences, the principle of minimal shared maternal effects, is examined, in light of the growing awareness that the maternal perinatal environment is a critical venue for the exercise of adaptive phenotypic plasticity.
Seeing the forest through the gene‐trees
TLDR
The new data are revealing how complex life’s genetic underpinnings actually are, and what the authors can’t detect contributes more to the understanding of life than has generally been thought.

References

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TLDR
This article argues that the thrifty phenotype is the consequence of three different adaptive processes ‐ niche construction, maternal effects, and developmental plasticity ‐ all of which in humans are influenced by the authors' large brains.
THE IMPACT OF INSECTICIDES AND HERBICIDES ON THE BIODIVERSITY AND PRODUCTIVITY OF AQUATIC COMMUNITIES
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This study represents one of the most extensive experimental inves- tigations of pesticide effects on aquatic communities and offers a comprehensive perspective on the impacts of pesticides when nontarget organisms are examined under ecologically relevant conditions.
The effects of pesticides, pH, and predatory stress on amphibians under mesocosm conditions
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TLDR
Whereas the stress of pH and predators can make carbaryl (and other pesticides) more lethal under laboratory conditions using repeated applications of carbaryl, these stressors did not interact under mesocosm conditions using a single application of carb Daryl.