Ecogeographical distribution of wild, weedy and cultivated Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench in Kenya: implications for conservation and crop-to-wild gene flow

@article{Mutegi2009EcogeographicalDO,
  title={Ecogeographical distribution of wild, weedy and cultivated Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench in Kenya: implications for conservation and crop-to-wild gene flow},
  author={Evans Mutegi and Fabrice Sagnard and Moses Muraya and Ben M. Kanyenji and Bernard Rono and Caroline Mwongera and Charles Marangu and Joseph Kamau and Heiko K. Parzies and Santie M. de Villiers and Kassa Semagn and Pierre Sibiry Traor{\'e} and Maryke Tine Labuschagne},
  journal={Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution},
  year={2009},
  volume={57},
  pages={243-253}
}
The potential gene flow between a crop and its wild relatives is largely determined by the overlaps in their ecological and geographical distributions. Ecogeographical databases are therefore indispensable tools for the sustainable management of genetic resources. In order to expand our knowledge of Sorghum bicolor distribution in Kenya, we conducted in situ collections of wild, weedy and cultivated sorghum. Qualitative and quantitative morphological traits were measured for each sampled wild… Expand

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