Echolocating Distance by Moving and Stationary Listeners

@article{Rosenblum2000EcholocatingDB,
  title={Echolocating Distance by Moving and Stationary Listeners},
  author={Lawrence D. Rosenblum and Michael S. Gordon and Luis Jarquin},
  journal={Ecological Psychology},
  year={2000},
  volume={12},
  pages={181 - 206}
}
It has long been known that human listeners can echolocate a sound-reflecting surface as they walk toward it. There is also evidence that stationary listeners can determine the location, shape, and material of nearby surfaces from reflected sound. This research tested whether there is an advantage of listener movement for echolocating as has been found for localization of emitted sounds. Blindfolded participants were asked to echolocate a 3 × 6 ft wall while either moving or remaining… 
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