Echinostomiasis: a common but forgotten food-borne disease.

@article{Graczyk1998EchinostomiasisAC,
  title={Echinostomiasis: a common but forgotten food-borne disease.},
  author={Thaddeus K. Graczyk and Bernard Fried},
  journal={The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene},
  year={1998},
  volume={58 4},
  pages={
          501-4
        }
}
  • T. Graczyk, B. Fried
  • Published 1 April 1998
  • Medicine
  • The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
Human echinostomiasis, endemic to southeast Asia and the Far East, is a food-borne, intestinal, zoonotic parasitosis attributed to at least 16 species of digenean trematodes transmitted by snails. Two separate life cycles of echinostomes, human and sylvatic, efficiently operate in endemic areas. Clinical symptoms of echinostomiasis include abdominal pain, violent watery diarrhea, and anorexia. The disease occurs focally and transmission is linked to fresh or brackish water habitats. Infections… 
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