Eavesdropping Squirrels Reduce Their Future Value of Food under the Perceived Presence of Cache Robbers

@article{Schmidt2008EavesdroppingSR,
  title={Eavesdropping Squirrels Reduce Their Future Value of Food under the Perceived Presence of Cache Robbers},
  author={K. A. Schmidt and Richard S. Ostfeld},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2008},
  volume={171},
  pages={386 - 393}
}
  • K. A. Schmidt, Richard S. Ostfeld
  • Published 2008
  • Medicine, Biology
  • The American Naturalist
  • Caching behavior frequently occurs within a social context that may include heterospecific cache pilferers. All else equal, the value of cacheable food should decline as the probability of cache recovering declines. We manipulated gray squirrels’ (Sciurus carolinensis) estimate of the probability of cache recovery using experimental playbacks of the vocalizations of a potential cache robber, the blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata). We used giving‐up densities (GUDs) to quantify relative changes in… CONTINUE READING

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