Eating Behavior and the Experience of Hunger Following Gastric Bypass Surgery for Morbid Obesity

@article{Delin1997EatingBA,
  title={Eating Behavior and the Experience of Hunger Following Gastric Bypass Surgery for Morbid Obesity},
  author={C. Delin and J. Watts and J. Saebel and P. G. Anderson},
  journal={Obesity Surgery},
  year={1997},
  volume={7},
  pages={405-413}
}
Background: Numerous different factors may contribute to the varying degrees of success observed following gastric bypass surgery. It is likely that alterations in the subjective experiences of hunger and satiety, as well as behavioral factors, are important. Our aim was to investigate the association of several factors, including qualitative aspects of hunger and satiety, eating patterns, and the emotional valence of different foods, to the weight loss that occurred following obesity surgery… Expand
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