Eastern Christianity and the Cold War, 1945-91

@inproceedings{Leustean2009EasternCA,
  title={Eastern Christianity and the Cold War, 1945-91},
  author={Lucian N. Leustean},
  year={2009}
}
Despite widespread persecution, Orthodox churches not only survived the Cold War period but levels of religiosity in Orthodox countries remained significant. This book examines the often surprising relations between Orthodox churches and political regimes. It provides a comprehensive overview of the dynamics between Eastern Christianity and politics from the end of the Second World War to the fall of communism, covering 40 Orthodox churches including diasporic churches in Africa, Asia, America… 
Religion and Socialism in the Long 1960s: From Antithesis to Dialogue in Eastern and Western Europe
One of themost remarkable transformations of European society and politics during theColdWar period was in relations between socialism and religion. Extreme hostility between revolutionary socialism
Religious change in Orthodox-majority Eastern Europe: from Nation-State to Global-Market
This article mobilises an analytical framework developed by the author in a series of solo and joint publications according to which religion has shifted from a Nation-State to a Global-Market
The glocalizations of Eastern Orthodox Christianity
This article introduces the notion of multiple glocalizations as a means of analysing Christianity’s historical record and argues that multiple glocalizations are constitutive of the intertwining
Religion, Politics and Law in the European Union: an Introduction 1
EU enlargement - to countries in Central and Eastern Europe in 2004, the inclusion of Bulgaria and Romania in 2007, and increasing debates on Turkey’s membership - has dramatically transformed the
Ecclesiastical nationalism and primacy in world Orthodoxy: the case of the Serbian Church at the pan-Orthodox Council in Crete
ABSTRACT The Holy and Great Council of the Orthodox Church (2016) was supposed to be, above all, a demonstration of Orthodox unity. However, four autocephalous Orthodox churches were absent and