East meets west: adaptive evolution of an insect introduced for biological control.

@article{Phillips2007EastMW,
  title={East meets west: adaptive evolution of an insect introduced for biological control.},
  author={Craig B. Phillips and David Baird and I. I. Iline and Mark Richard McNeill and J. R. Proffitt and Stephen L. Goldson and John M. Kean},
  journal={Journal of Applied Ecology},
  year={2007},
  volume={45},
  pages={948-956}
}
1. A possible explanation for low success rates when introducing natural enemies to new regions for biological control of insect pests is that they fail to adapt to their new conditions. Therefore it has been widely recommended that biological control practitioners increase the probability of local adaptation by maximizing the genetic variation released. An alternative recommendation is to use climate matching to identify native populations that may already possess traits suited to the new… 
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