Easily Cracked: Scientific Instruments in States of Disrepair

@article{Schaffer2011EasilyCS,
  title={Easily Cracked: Scientific Instruments in States of Disrepair},
  author={S. Schaffer},
  journal={Isis},
  year={2011},
  volume={102},
  pages={706 - 717}
}
There has been much scholarly attention to definitions of the term “scientific instrument.” Rather more mundane work by makers, curators, and users is devoted to instruments' maintenance and repair. A familiar argument holds that when a tool breaks, its character and recalcitrance become evident. Much can be gained from historical study of instruments' breakages, defects, and recuperation. Maintenance and repair technologies have been a vital aspect of relations between makers and other users… Expand
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