Ease of juggling: studying the effects of manual multitasking

@article{Oulasvirta2011EaseOJ,
  title={Ease of juggling: studying the effects of manual multitasking},
  author={Antti Oulasvirta and Joanna Bergstrom-Lehtovirta},
  journal={Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems},
  year={2011}
}
Everyday activities often involve using an interactive device while one is handling various other physical objects (wallets, bags, doors, pens, mugs, etc.). This paper presents the Manual Multitasking Test, a test with 12 conditions emulating manual demands of everyday multitasking situations. It allows experimenters to expose the effects of design on "manual flexibility": users' ability to reconfigure the sensorimotor control of arms, hands, and fingers in order to regain the high performance… 
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