Earth's biggest ‘whodunnit’: unravelling the clues in the case of the end–Permian mass extinction

@article{White2002EarthsB,
  title={Earth's biggest ‘whodunnit’: unravelling the clues in the case of the end–Permian mass extinction},
  author={Rosalind V. White},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences},
  year={2002},
  volume={360},
  pages={2963 - 2985}
}
  • Rosalind V. White
  • Published 2002
  • Geography, Medicine
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
The mass extinction that occurred at the end of the Permian period, 250 million years ago, was the most devastating loss of life that Earth has ever experienced. It is estimated that ca. 96% of marine species were wiped out and land plants, reptiles, amphibians and insects also suffered. The causes of this catastrophic event are currently a topic of intense debate. The geological record points to significant environmental disturbances, for example, global warming and stagnation of ocean water… Expand
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