Earth’s first stable continents did not form by subduction

@article{Johnson2017EarthsFS,
  title={Earth’s first stable continents did not form by subduction},
  author={Tim E. Johnson and Michael Brown and Nicholas J. Gardiner and Christopher L. Kirkland and Robert H. Smithies},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2017},
  volume={543},
  pages={239-242}
}
The geodynamic environment in which Earth’s first continents formed and were stabilized remains controversial. Most exposed continental crust that can be dated back to the Archaean eon (4 billion to 2.5 billion years ago) comprises tonalite–trondhjemite–granodiorite rocks (TTGs) that were formed through partial melting of hydrated low-magnesium basaltic rocks; notably, these TTGs have ‘arc-like’ signatures of trace elements and thus resemble the continental crust produced in modern subduction… 
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TLDR
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