Early vestibular processing does not discriminate active from passive self-motion if there is a discrepancy between predicted and actual proprioceptive feedback.

@article{Brooks2014EarlyVP,
  title={Early vestibular processing does not discriminate active from passive self-motion if there is a discrepancy between predicted and actual proprioceptive feedback.},
  author={Jessica X. Brooks and K. Cullen},
  journal={Journal of neurophysiology},
  year={2014},
  volume={111 12},
  pages={
          2465-78
        }
}
  • Jessica X. Brooks, K. Cullen
  • Published 2014
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Journal of neurophysiology
  • Most of our sensory experiences are gained by active exploration of the world. While the ability to distinguish sensory inputs resulting of our own actions (termed reafference) from those produced externally (termed exafference) is well established, the neural mechanisms underlying this distinction are not fully understood. We have previously proposed that vestibular signals arising from self-generated movements are inhibited by a mechanism that compares the internal prediction of the… CONTINUE READING

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