Early life stress disrupts social behavior and prefrontal cortex parvalbumin interneurons at an earlier time-point in females than in males.

@article{Holland2014EarlyLS,
  title={Early life stress disrupts social behavior and prefrontal cortex parvalbumin interneurons at an earlier time-point in females than in males.},
  author={Freedom H Holland and Prabarna Ganguly and David N. Potter and Elena H. Chartoff and Heather C. Brenhouse},
  journal={Neuroscience letters},
  year={2014},
  volume={566},
  pages={131-6}
}
Early life stress exposure (ELS) yields risk for psychiatric disorders that might occur though a population-specific mechanism that impacts prefrontal cortical development. Sex differences in ELS effects are largely unknown and are also essential to understand social and cognitive development. ELS can cause dysfunction within parvalbumin (PVB)-containing inhibitory interneurons in the prefrontal cortex and in several prefrontal cortex-mediated behaviors including social interaction. Social… CONTINUE READING
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Early life stress disrupts social behavior and prefrontal cortex paravalbumin interneurons at an earlier time - point in females than in males

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