Early language acquisition: cracking the speech code

@article{Kuhl2004EarlyLA,
  title={Early language acquisition: cracking the speech code},
  author={Patricia K. Kuhl},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2004},
  volume={5},
  pages={831-843}
}
  • P. Kuhl
  • Published 1 November 2004
  • Linguistics
  • Nature Reviews Neuroscience
Infants learn language with remarkable speed, but how they do it remains a mystery. New data show that infants use computational strategies to detect the statistical and prosodic patterns in language input, and that this leads to the discovery of phonemes and words. Social interaction with another human being affects speech learning in a way that resembles communicative learning in songbirds. The brain's commitment to the statistical and prosodic patterns that are experienced early in life… 
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