Early infancy microbial and metabolic alterations affect risk of childhood asthma

@article{Arrieta2015EarlyIM,
  title={Early infancy microbial and metabolic alterations affect risk of childhood asthma},
  author={Marie Claire Arrieta and Leah T. Stiemsma and Pedro A. Dimitriu and Lisa M. Thorson and Shannon L. Russell and Sophie Yurist-Doutsch and Boris Kuzeljevic and Matthew J. Gold and Heidi M. Britton and Diana L Lefebvre and Padmaja Subbarao and Piush J Mandhane and Allan B Becker and Kelly M. McNagny and Malcolm R. Sears and Tobias R. Kollmann and William W. Mohn and Stuart E. Turvey and B. Brett Finlay},
  journal={Science Translational Medicine},
  year={2015},
  volume={7},
  pages={307ra152 - 307ra152}
}
Supplementing bacterial genera reduced in infants at high risk for asthma ameliorates lung inflammation in mice. Window of opportunity for asthma Changes in the gut microbiota have been implicated in the development of asthma in animal models; however, it has remained unclear whether these findings hold true in humans. Now, Arrieta et al. report in a longitudinal human study that infants at risk of asthma have transient gut microbial dysbiosis during the first 100 days of life. They found that… 
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