Early human symbolic behavior in the Late Pleistocene of Wallacea

@article{Brumm2017EarlyHS,
  title={Early human symbolic behavior in the Late Pleistocene of Wallacea},
  author={Adam Brumm and Michelle C. Langley and Mark W Moore and Budianto Hakim and M. Ramli and Iwan Sumantri and Basran Burhan and Andi Muhammad Saiful and Linda Siagian and Suryatman and Ratno Sardi and Andi Jusdi and Abdullah and Andi Pampang Mubarak and Hasliana and Hasrianti and Adhi Agus Oktaviana and S. Adhityatama and Gerrit van den Bergh and Maxime Aubert and Jian-xin Zhao and Jillian Huntley and Bo Li and Richard G. Roberts and E. Wahyu Saptomo and Yinika L Perston and Rainer Gr{\"u}n},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2017},
  volume={114},
  pages={4105 - 4110}
}
Significance We present evidence from the Late Pleistocene of Sulawesi, Indonesia, where an unusually rich and unique symbolic complex was excavated from archaeological deposits spanning 30,000 to 22,000 y ago. Including previously unknown practices of self-ornamentation, used ochre, pigmented artifacts, and portable art, these findings advance our knowledge of the cultural repertoires of modern humans in Pleistocene Wallacea, including the nonparietal artworks and symbolic material culture of… Expand
Symbolic expression in Pleistocene Sahul, Sunda, and Wallacea
The pace of research undertaken in Sunda (Southeast Asia) through to Sahul (Greater Australia) has increased exponentially over the last three decades, resulting in spectacular discoveries rangingExpand
Portable art from Pleistocene Sulawesi
TLDR
The discovery of two small stone ‘plaquettes’ incised with figurative imagery dating to 26–14 ka from Leang Bulu Bettue, Sulawesi overturns the long-held belief that the first H. sapiens of Southeast Asia–Australasia did not create sophisticated art and cements the importance of this behaviour for the authors' species’ ability to overcome environmental and social challenges. Expand
Oldest human occupation of Wallacea at Laili Cave, Timor-Leste, shows broad-spectrum foraging responses to late Pleistocene environments
The Wallacea Archipelago provides an extraordinary laboratory for the study of human colonisation and adaptation, yet few detailed archaeological studies have been conducted in the region that spanExpand
A reassessment of the early archaeological record at Leang Burung 2, a Late Pleistocene rock-shelter site on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi
TLDR
These findings include fossils of now-extinct proboscideans and other ‘megafauna’ in stratified context, as well as a cobble-based stone artifact technology comparable to that produced by late Middle Pleistocene hominins elsewhere on Sulawesi. Expand
Bows and arrows and complex symbolic displays 48,000 years ago in the South Asian tropics
TLDR
Evidence for bow-and-arrow hunting toolkits alongside a complex symbolic repertoire from 48,000 years before present at the Sri Lankan site of Fa-Hien Lena provides the first detailed insights into how H. sapiens met the extreme adaptive challenges that were encountered in Asia during global expansion. Expand
Skeletal remains of a Pleistocene modern human (Homo sapiens) from Sulawesi
TLDR
This fragmentary specimen, though largely undiagnostic with regards to morphological affinity, provides the only direct insight from the fossil record into the identity of the Late Pleistocene people of Sulawesi. Expand
Earliest hunting scene in prehistoric art
TLDR
An elaborate rock art panel from the limestone cave of Leang Bulu’ Sipong 4 (Sulawesi, Indonesia) that portrays several figures that appear to represent therianthropes hunting wild pigs and dwarf bovids is described, providing evidence of early storytelling through narrative hunting scenes. Expand
Murujuga desert, tide, and dreaming: Understanding early rock art production and lifeways in northwest Australia
The Dampier Archipelago (Murujuga) in northwestern Australia is a rich rock art province located in an arid-maritime cultural landscape. The archipelago juts into the Indian Ocean just north of theExpand
Retracing Alfred Russel Wallace’s 1857 expedition to the Maros karsts of Sulawesi
TLDR
Wallace's written narratives, local histories and landscape surveys are used to identify the location of Mesman’s estate where Wallace was based during his time in Maros, an excursion that took place just a few months before he wrote his famous ‘Ternate essay’ in February 1858. Expand
Island migration and foraging behaviour by anatomically modern humans during the late Pleistocene to Holocene in Wallacea: New evidence from Central Sulawesi, Indonesia
Abstract Maritime migration and island adaptation by anatomically modern humans (AMH) are among the most significant issues in Southeast Asian anthropology and archaeology, and directly related toExpand
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 65 REFERENCES
Pleistocene cave art from Sulawesi, Indonesia
TLDR
It can now be demonstrated that humans were producing rock art by ∼40 kyr ago at opposite ends of the Pleistocene Eurasian world. Expand
Earliest hominin occupation of Sulawesi, Indonesia
TLDR
The findings suggest that Sulawesi, like Flores, was host to a long-established population of archaic hominins, the ancestral origins and taxonomic status of which remain elusive. Expand
An engraved artifact from Shuidonggou, an Early Late Paleolithic Site in Northwest China
Cognition and symbolic thinking are viewed as important features of modern human behavior. Engraved objects are seen as a hallmark of cognition and symbolism, and even as evidence for language.Expand
Aurignacian ethno-linguistic geography of Europe revealed by personal ornaments
Our knowledge of the migration routes of the first anatomically modern populations colonising the European territory at the beginning of the Upper Palaeolithic, of their degree of biological,Expand
Signs of Life: Engraved Stone Artefacts from Neolithic South India
While exceedingly rare on any given archaeological site, engraved stone artefacts have nonetheless been reported from sites covering a range of periods and regions across the world. Attempts toExpand
Genetic and archaeological perspectives on the initial modern human colonization of southern Asia
TLDR
This work presents an alternative model based on a combination of genetic analyses and recent archaeological evidence from South Asia and Africa that supports a coastally oriented dispersal of modern humans from eastern Africa to southern Asia ∼60–50 thousand years ago (ka). Expand
A female figurine from the basal Aurignacian of Hohle Fels Cave in southwestern Germany
TLDR
The discovery of a female mammoth-ivory figurine in the basal Aurignacian deposit at Hohle Fels Cave in the Swabian Jura of southwestern Germany during excavations in 2008 is reported, making it one of the oldest known examples of figurative art. Expand
Symbolic Revolutions and the Australian Archaeological Record
Australia was colonized by at least 40,000 bp and scientists agree that the continent was only ever occupied by anatomically and behaviourally modern humans. Australia thus offers an alternativeExpand
The 'human revolution' in lowland tropical Southeast Asia: the antiquity and behavior of anatomically modern humans at Niah Cave (Sarawak, Borneo).
TLDR
The Niah evidence demonstrates the sophisticated nature of the subsistence behavior developed by modern humans to exploit the tropical environments that they encountered in Southeast Asia, including rainforest. Expand
From small holes to grand narratives: the impact of taphonomy and sample size on the modernity debate in Australia and New Guinea.
TLDR
It is argued that differences in the nature of early modern human populations across the globe were more likely the consequence of differences in population size and density, interaction and historical contingency. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...