Early human presence in the Arctic: Evidence from 45,000-year-old mammoth remains

@article{Pitulko2016EarlyHP,
  title={Early human presence in the Arctic: Evidence from 45,000-year-old mammoth remains},
  author={Vladimir V Pitulko and Alexei N. Tikhonov and Elena Yu Pavlova and Pavel A. Nikolskiy and Konstantin E. Kuper and Roman N Polozov},
  journal={Science},
  year={2016},
  volume={351},
  pages={260 - 263}
}
Earliest human Arctic occupation Paleolithic records of humans in the Eurasian Arctic (above 66°N) are scarce, stretching back to 30,000 to 35,000 years ago at most. Pitulko et al. have found evidence of human occupation 45,000 years ago at 72°N, well within the Siberian Arctic. The evidence is in the form of a frozen mammoth carcass bearing many signs of weapon-inflicted injuries, both pre- and postmortem. The remains of a hunted wolf from a widely separate location of similar age indicate… Expand

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