Early human dispersals within the Americas

@article{MorenoMayar2018EarlyHD,
  title={Early human dispersals within the Americas},
  author={Jos{\'e} V{\'i}ctor Moreno-Mayar and Lasse Vinner and Peter de Barros Damgaard and Constanza de la Fuente and Jeffrey Chan and Jeffrey P. Spence and Morten E. Allentoft and Tharsika Vimala and Fernando Racimo and Thomaz Pinotti and Simon Rasmussen and Ashot Margaryan and Miren Iraeta Orbegozo and Dorothea Mylopotamitaki and Matthew J. Wooller and Cl{\'e}ment P. Bataille and Lorena Becerra-Valdivia and David Chivall and Daniel J. Comeskey and Thibaut Devi{\`e}se and Donald K. Grayson and Len George and Harold Harry and Verner Alexandersen and Charlotte Primeau and Jon M. Erlandson and Claudia Rodrigues-Carvalho and Silvia Reis and Murilo Q. R. Bastos and Jerome S. Cybulski and Carlos Vullo and Flavia Morello and Miguel G. Vilar and Spencer Wells and Kristian Murphy Gregersen and Kasper Lykke Hansen and Niels Lynnerup and Marta Miraz{\'o}n Lahr and Kurt H. Kj{\ae}r and Andr{\'e} M. Strauss and Marta Alfonso-Durruty and Antonio Salas and Hannes Schroeder and Thomas F.G. Higham and Ripan Singh Malhi and Jeffrey T. Rasic and Luizinho de Souza and Fabr{\'i}cio Rodrigues Santos and Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas and Martin Sikora and Rasmus Nielsen and Yun S. Song and David J. Meltzer and Eske Willerslev},
  journal={Science},
  year={2018},
  volume={362}
}
Complex processes in the settling of the Americas The expansion into the Americas by the ancestors of present day Native Americans has been difficult to tease apart from analyses of present day populations. To understand how humans diverged and spread across North and South America, Moreno-Mayar et al. sequenced 15 ancient human genomes from Alaska to Patagonia. Analysis of the oldest genomes suggests that there was an early split within Beringian populations, giving rise to the Northern and… 

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