Early experience with CGP 4718 A (Sercloremine), a new selective and reversible MAO‐A and 5‐HT‐uptake inhibitor, in the treatment of depressive patients

@article{DeliniStula1985EarlyEW,
  title={Early experience with CGP 4718 A (Sercloremine), a new selective and reversible MAO‐A and 5‐HT‐uptake inhibitor, in the treatment of depressive patients},
  author={Alexandra Delini-Stula and Rolf Fischbach and F. Gnirss and E. Bure{\vs} and Walter P{\"o}ldinger},
  journal={Drug Development Research},
  year={1985},
  volume={6}
}
Tolerability of CGP 4718 A (sercloremine), a 4‐(5‐chloro‐2‐benzofuranyl)‐1‐methyl‐piperdine, as well as the effects on target symptoms in 22 hospitalized depressed patients, were investigated in an open, multicenter study. In daily doses of 50 to 150 mg, the compound was well tolerated. There were no changes in cardiovascular parameters (blood pressure, ECG) nor were there changes in laboratory values that could be considered of clinical relevance. Of concern, however, were sleep disturbances… 
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