Early emergence and resource availability can competitively favour natives over a functionally similar invader

@article{Firn2010EarlyEA,
  title={Early emergence and resource availability can competitively favour natives over a functionally similar invader},
  author={J. Firn and A. MacDougall and S. Schmidt and Y. Buckley},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2010},
  volume={163},
  pages={775-784}
}
Invasive plant species can form dense populations across large tracts of land. Based on these observations of dominance, invaders are often described as competitively superior, despite little direct evidence of competitive interactions with natives. The few studies that have measured competitive interactions have tended to compare an invader to natives that are unlikely to be strong competitors because they are functionally different. In this study, we measured competitive interactions among an… Expand

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