Early dates for 'Neanderthal cave art' may be wrong.

@article{Aubert2018EarlyDF,
  title={Early dates for 'Neanderthal cave art' may be wrong.},
  author={Maxime Aubert and Adam Brumm and Jillian Huntley},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={2018},
  volume={125},
  pages={
          215-217
        }
}
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