Early adverse experience as a developmental risk factor for later psychopathology: Evidence from rodent and primate models

@article{Sanchez2001EarlyAE,
  title={Early adverse experience as a developmental risk factor for later psychopathology: Evidence from rodent and primate models},
  author={M. Mar Sánchez and Charlotte O. Ladd and Paul M. Plotsky},
  journal={Development and Psychopathology},
  year={2001},
  volume={13},
  pages={419 - 449}
}
Increasing evidence supports the view that the interaction of perinatal exposure to adversity with individual genetic liabilities may increase an individual's vulnerability to the expression of psycho- and physiopathology throughout life. The early environment appears to program some aspects of neurobiological development and, in turn, behavioral, emotional, cognitive, and physiological development. Several rodent and primate models of early adverse experience have been analyzed in this review… 
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