Early Homo and the role of the genus in paleoanthropology.

@article{Villmoare2018EarlyHA,
  title={Early Homo and the role of the genus in paleoanthropology.},
  author={Brian A. Villmoare},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={2018},
  volume={165 Suppl 65},
  pages={
          72-89
        }
}
  • B. Villmoare
  • Published 30 January 2018
  • Biology
  • American journal of physical anthropology
The history of the discovery of early fossils attributed to the genus Homo has been contentious, with scholars disagreeing over the generic assignment of fossils proposed as members of our genus. In this manuscript I review the history of discovery and debate over early Homo and evaluate the various taxonomic hypotheses for the genus. To get a sense of how hominin taxonomy compares to taxonomic practice outside paleoanthropology, I compare the diversity of Homo to genera in other vertebrate… 
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