Early Hominin Foot Morphology Based on 1.5-Million-Year-Old Footprints from Ileret, Kenya

@article{Bennett2009EarlyHF,
  title={Early Hominin Foot Morphology Based on 1.5-Million-Year-Old Footprints from Ileret, Kenya},
  author={Matthew R. Bennett and John W. K. Harris and Brian G. Richmond and David R Braun and Emma N Mbua and Purity Kiura and Daniel Ochieng Olago and Mzalendo Kibunjia and Christine Omuombo and Anna K. Behrensmeyer and David Huddart and Silvia Gonz{\'a}lez},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={323},
  pages={1197 - 1201}
}
Hominin footprints offer evidence about gait and foot shape, but their scarcity, combined with an inadequate hominin fossil record, hampers research on the evolution of the human gait. Here, we report hominin footprints in two sedimentary layers dated at 1.51 to 1.53 million years ago (Ma) at Ileret, Kenya, providing the oldest evidence of an essentially modern human–like foot anatomy, with a relatively adducted hallux, medial longitudinal arch, and medial weight transfer before push-off. The… Expand
Hominin stature, body mass, and walking speed estimates based on 1.5 million-year-old fossil footprints at Ileret, Kenya.
TLDR
The results of controlled experiments with habitually unshod Daasanach adults from Ileret are reported to examine the relationships between stride length and speed, and also those between footprint size, body mass, and stature and to estimate travel speeds from the fossil hominin footprint trails. Expand
Footprints reveal direct evidence of group behavior and locomotion in Homo erectus
TLDR
These footprints provide the oldest direct evidence for modern human-like weight transfer and confirm the presence of an energy-saving longitudinally arched foot in H. erectus. Expand
One small step: A review of Plio-Pleistocene hominin foot evolution.
TLDR
This review document anatomical differences between extant ape and human foot bones, and comprehensively examine the hominin foot fossil record, and finds strong evidence for mosaic evolution of the foot, and a variety of anatomically and functionally distinct foot forms as bipedal locomotion evolved. Expand
Human-like external function of the foot, and fully upright gait, confirmed in the 3.66 million year old Laetoli hominin footprints by topographic statistics, experimental footprint-formation and computer simulation
It is commonly held that the major functional features of the human foot (e.g. a functional longitudinal medial arch, lateral to medial force transfer and hallucal (big-toe) push-off) appear only inExpand
Evolution of the hominin knee and ankle.
TLDR
It appears that longer distance dispersals that delivered the Dmanisi hominins to Georgia and H. erectus to east-southeast Asia by 1.6 Ma were facilitated by the evolution of a morphologically derived knee complex comparable to that of recent humans and an ankle that was morphologically primitive. Expand
Earliest complete hominin fifth metatarsal-Implications for the evolution of the lateral column of the foot.
TLDR
It is concluded that, at least in the lateral component of the foot of the StW 114/115 individual, the biomechanical pattern is very similar to that of modern humans. Expand
Footprints and human evolution: Homeostasis in foot function?
TLDR
The data suggest that the evolutionary development of modern biomechanical locomotion pre-dates the earliest human tracks and also the transition from the genus Australopithecus to Homo, which involved the development of anatomy and physiology better-suited to endurance running and walking. Expand
New footprints from Laetoli (Tanzania) provide evidence for marked body size variation in early hominins
TLDR
Hinin tracks unearthed in the new Site S at Laetoli are reported and referred to two bipedal individuals (S1 and S2) moving on the same palaeosurface and in the same direction as the three hominins documented at Site G, consistent with considerable body size variation and, probably, degree of sexual dimorphism within a single species of bipedals as early as 3.66 million years ago. Expand
Morphometric analysis of the hominin talus: Evolutionary and functional implications.
TLDR
The results suggest that a more everted foot and stiffer medial midtarsal region are adaptations that coincide with the emergence of bipedalism, whereas a high medial longitudinal arch emerges later in time, within Homo. Expand
Ichnotaxonomy of the Laetoli trackways: The earliest hominin footprints
Abstract At 3.6 Ma, the Laetoli Pliocene hominin trackways are the earliest direct evidence of hominin bipedalism. Three decades since their discovery, not only is the question of their attributionExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 70 REFERENCES
Orrorin tugenensis Femoral Morphology and the Evolution of Hominin Bipedalism
TLDR
Femoral morphology indicates that Orrorin tugenensis shared distinctive hip biomechanics with australopiths, suggesting that this complex evolved early in human evolution and persisted for almost 4 million years until modifications of the hip appeared in the late Pliocene in early Homo. Expand
Further progress on the Laetoli trails
In addition to showing that bipedalism notably preceded the appearance of stone tools and ballooning brains in the paleontological record, the 3.5 million-year-old footprint trails at Laetoli Site G,Expand
New evidence for hominin carcass processing strategies at 1.5 Ma, Koobi Fora, Kenya.
TLDR
Analysis of three approximately 1.5 million-year-old archaeofaunas from areas 1A and 103 in the Okote Member of the Koobi Fora Formation, northern Kenya increases knowledge of the dietary behavior and ecology of Homo erectus, and provides support for variability in early Pleistocene hominin carcass foraging patterns. Expand
Early hominin limb proportions.
TLDR
Results suggest that the relative forearm length of BOU-VP-12/1 is unique among hominins, exceeding those of the African apes and resembling the proportions in Pongo, and that it may be premature to consider H. habilis as having more apelike limb proportions than those in A. afarensis. Expand
Pliocene hominid gait: new interpretations based on available footprint data from Laetoli.
TLDR
When early hominid footprint data is fitted to regression equations of high predictability for the interrelationship of these locomotor parameters in modern man, a pattern of gait emerges that contradicts previous reconstructions. Expand
From biped to strider : the emergence of modern human walking, running, and resource transport
1. Striders, Runners, Transporters C.E. Hilton, D.J. Meldrum. 2. Knuckle-walking and the Origin of Bipedalism D.R. Begun. 3. A New Hypothesis on the Origin of Hominoid Locomotion Y. Deloison. 4.Expand
Hominid footprints at Laetoli: facts and interpretations.
  • T. White, G. Suwa
  • Geography, Medicine
  • American journal of physical anthropology
  • 1987
TLDR
It is concluded that A. afarensis represents the best candidate for the maker of the Laetoli hominid trails and shows that neither hypotheses are likely to be entirely correct. Expand
Australopithecus to Homo: Transformations in Body and Mind
▪ Abstract Significant changes occurred in human evolution between 2.5 and 1.8 million years ago. Stone tools first appeared, brains expanded, bodies enlarged, sexual dimorphism in body sizeExpand
Pleistocene human footprints from the Willandra Lakes, Southeastern Australia.
TLDR
Recently discovered fossil trackways of human footprints from the Willandra Lakes region of western New South Wales, Australia offer a unique glimpse of humans living in the arid inland of Australia at the height of the last glacial period. Expand
Implications of new early Homo fossils from Ileret, east of Lake Turkana, Kenya
TLDR
Two new cranial fossils from the Koobi Fora Formation, east of Lake Turkana in Kenya, are described that have bearing on the relationship between species of early Homo and confirm the distinctiveness of H.’shabilis and H.erectus, independently of overall cranial size, and suggest that these two early taxa were living broadly sympatrically in the same lake basin for almost half a million years. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...