Early Crocodylomorpha

@inproceedings{Irmis2013EarlyC,
  title={Early Crocodylomorpha},
  author={Randall B. Irmis and Sterling J. Nesbitt and Hans‐Dieter Sues},
  year={2013}
}
Abstract Non-crocodyliform crocodylomorphs, often called ‘sphenosuchians’, were the earliest-diverging lineages of Crocodylomorpha, and document the stepwise acquisition of many of the features that characterize extant crocodylians. The first crocodylomorph fossils are approximately 230 million years old (upper Carnian, Late Triassic), and at least one of these early lineages persisted until at least 150 million years ago (Late Jurassic). These taxa occupied a wide variety of terrestrial… Expand

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