Early Biometric Lag in the Prediction of Small for Gestational Age Neonates and Preeclampsia

@article{Schwartz2011EarlyBL,
  title={Early Biometric Lag in the Prediction of Small for Gestational Age Neonates and Preeclampsia},
  author={N. Schwartz and C. Pessel and J. Coletta and A. Krieger and I. Timor-Tritsch},
  journal={Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine},
  year={2011},
  volume={30}
}
An early fetal growth lag may be a marker of future complications. We sought to determine the utility of early biometric variables in predicting adverse pregnancy outcomes. 
5 Citations
Two‐dimensional sonographic placental measurements in the prediction of small‐for‐gestational‐age infants
  • N. Schwartz, E. Wang, S. Parry
  • Medicine
  • Ultrasound in obstetrics & gynecology : the official journal of the International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • 2012
TLDR
To determine the utility of two‐dimensional (2D) sonographic placental measurements in the prediction of small‐for‐gestational‐age (SGA) infants, a large number of studies have relied on single-dimensional measurements. Expand
External validation and clinical usefulness of first‐trimester prediction models for small‐ and large‐for‐gestational‐age infants: a prospective cohort study
To assess the external validity of all published first‐trimester prediction models based on routinely collected maternal predictors for the risk of small‐ and large‐for‐gestational‐age (SGA and LGA)Expand
Slow fetal growth between first and early second trimester ultrasound scans and risk of small for gestational age (SGA) birth
TLDR
Fetuses with slow growth of biparietal diameter at ultrasound examination in early second trimester exhibit increased risk of being born SGA independent of gestational age at birth and presence of maternal hypertensive diseases or diabetes mellitus. Expand
Clinical risk factors for pre-eclampsia determined in early pregnancy: systematic review and meta-analysis of large cohort studies
TLDR
A practical evidence based list of clinical risk factors that can be assessed by a clinician at ≤16 weeks’ gestation to estimate a woman’s risk of pre-eclampsia and the use of aspirin prophylaxis in pregnancy is developed. Expand
Ultrasound assessment of intrauterine growth restriction: relationship to neonatal body composition.
TLDR
Newborn %BF was significantly lower in infants with EFW less than the 10th percentile compared with AC less thanThe fifth percentile, an intermediate finding. Expand

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 21 REFERENCES
Second‐trimester fetal growth and the risk of poor obstetric and neonatal outcomes
  • N. Fox, M. Huang, S. Chasen
  • Medicine
  • Ultrasound in obstetrics & gynecology : the official journal of the International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • 2008
TLDR
To compare outcomes of Fetuses with an estimated fetal weight (EFW) < 25th percentile in the second trimester to those in fetuses with EFW ≥ 25th percentiles in the first trimester, a dummy pregnancy is considered. Expand
Fetal growth between the first and second trimesters and the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome
To relate growth rate of the biparietal diameter (BPD) between the first and second trimesters to the risk of perinatal death, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), macrosomia, preterm/post‐termExpand
Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: screening by biophysical and biochemical markers at 11–13 weeks
To examine the performance of screening for pre‐eclampsia (PE) and gestational hypertension (GH) by a combination of maternal factors and various biophysical and biochemical markers at 11–13 weeks'Expand
Adverse obstetric outcome in fetuses that are smaller than expected at second trimester routine ultrasound examination
TLDR
Adverse obstetric outcome in fetuses that are smaller than expected at second trimester routine ultrasound examination in women with high-risk pregnancies is found. Expand
Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: combined screening by uterine artery Doppler, blood pressure and serum PAPP‐A at 11–13 weeks
To explore if the addition of pregnancy‐associated plasma protein‐A (PAPP‐A) to maternal factors and biophysical markers yields a significant improvement in the detection of hypertensive disordersExpand
Estimation of gestational age from measurements of fetal long bones.
TLDR
The authors tried to calculate gestational age from the lengths of long bones (femur, humerus, tibia, ulna) from 12 to 40 weeks of gestation, finding the combined use of the four bones allows a good estimation of Gestational age. Expand
Early Fetal Size and Growth as Predictors of Adverse Outcome
TLDR
Slow growth of the fetal biparietal diameter between the first and second trimesters of pregnancy is a strong predictor of perinatal death before 34 weeks. Expand
Perinatal Outcome and Later Implications of Intrauterine Growth Restriction
TLDR
This chapter reviews outcomes for children who have intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) or small-for-gestation-age (SGA) status at birth, noting an increased risk for short stature, cognitive delays with decreased academic achievement, and a small but significant increased risk of neurologic disorders. Expand
Use of uterine artery Doppler ultrasonography to predict pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction: a systematic review and bivariable meta-analysis
TLDR
Uterine artery Doppler ultrasonography provided a more accurate prediction when performed in the second trimester than in the first-trimester, and an increased pulsatility index with notching was the best predictor of pre-eclampsia. Expand
Markers for Presymptomatic Prediction of Preeclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction
TLDR
Molecules associated with the establishment of the placenta and essential in fetal–maternal interactions seem to be the most likely candidates for presymptomatic markers for preeclampsia and/or intrauterine growth restriction. Expand
...
1
2
3
...