Early Administration of Low-Dose Aspirin for the Prevention of Preterm and Term Preeclampsia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

@article{Roberge2012EarlyAO,
  title={Early Administration of Low-Dose Aspirin for the Prevention of Preterm and Term Preeclampsia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis},
  author={St{\'e}phanie Roberge and Pia M Villa and Kypros H. Nicolaides and Yves Gigu{\`e}re and Merja Vainio and A. Bakthi and Alaa Ebrashy and Emmanuel Bujold},
  journal={Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy},
  year={2012},
  volume={31},
  pages={141 - 146}
}
Objective: To compare the effect of early administration of aspirin on the risk of preterm and term preeclampsia. Method: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials were performed. Women who were randomized to low-dose aspirin or placebo/no treatment at or before 16 weeks of gestation were included. The outcomes of interest were preterm preeclampsia (delivery <37 weeks) and term preeclampsia. Pooled relative risks (RR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were… 

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