Earliest known hominin activity in the Philippines by 709 thousand years ago

@article{Ingicco2018EarliestKH,
  title={Earliest known hominin activity in the Philippines by 709 thousand years ago},
  author={Thomas Ingicco and G. D. van den Bergh and C. Jago-on and Jean‐Jacques Bahain and M. Gema Chac{\'o}n and Noel Amano and Hubert Forestier and C. King and K. M. Manalo and S. Nomade and A. Pereira and Marian C. Reyes and Anne-Marie S{\'e}mah and Qinglong Shao and Pierre Voinchet and Christophe Falgu{\`e}res and Patricia C. Albers and Maria Corazon Lising and George A. Lyras and Dida Yurnaldi and Pierre Rochette and {\'A}ngel P. Bautista and John de Vos},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2018},
  volume={557},
  pages={233-237}
}
Over 60 years ago, stone tools and remains of megafauna were discovered on the Southeast Asian islands of Flores, Sulawesi and Luzon, and a Middle Pleistocene colonization by Homo erectus was initially proposed to have occurred on these islands1–4. However, until the discovery of Homo floresiensis in 2003, claims of the presence of archaic hominins on Wallacean islands were hypothetical owing to the absence of in situ fossils and/or stone artefacts that were excavated from well-documented… 
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