Earliest known crown-group salamanders

@article{Gao2003EarliestKC,
  title={Earliest known crown-group salamanders},
  author={Ke-Qin Gao and Neil H. Shubin},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2003},
  volume={422},
  pages={424-428}
}
Salamanders are a model system for studying the rates and patterns of the evolution of new anatomical structures. Recent discoveries of abundant Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous salamanders are helping to address these issues. Here we report the discovery of well-preserved Middle Jurassic salamanders from China, which constitutes the earliest known record of crown-group urodeles (living salamanders and their closest relatives). The new specimens are from the volcanic deposits of the… 

Figures from this paper

A Relict Stem Salamander: Evidence from the Early Cretaceous of Siberia
  • P. Skutschas
  • Environmental Science
    Acta Palaeontologica Polonica
  • 2014
The early evolution of salamanders, which are one of the three living groups of lissamphibians, is not well known. Both stem- and crown-group salamanders first appeared in the Middle Jurassic
A Late Jurassic salamander (Amphibia: Caudata) from the Morrison Formation of North America
TLDR
The first articulated salamander skeleton from the Jurassic of Euramerica is described, recovered from Upper Jurassic deposits of the Morrison Formation, Dinosaur National Monument, USA, showing a combination of primitive and derived character states that distinguish it from all known Mesozoic salamanders and which permit the erection of a new genus and species.
A Triassic stem-salamander from Kyrgyzstan and the origin of salamanders
TLDR
A new specimen of Triassurus sixtelae is reported, a hitherto enigmatic tetrapod from the Middle/Late Triassic of Kyrgyzstan, which is identified as the geologically oldest stem-group salamander, shedding light not only on the early evolution of the salamanders body plan, but also on the origin of the group as a whole.
A New Basal Salamandroid (Amphibia, Urodela) from the Late Jurassic of Qinglong, Hebei Province, China
TLDR
Comparative study of the new salamander with previously known fossil and extant salamandroids sheds new light on the early evolution of the Salamandroidea, the most species-diverse clade in the Urodela.
Vertebral development of modern salamanders provides insights into a unique event of their evolutionary history.
  • Catherine A. Boisvert
  • Biology
    Journal of experimental zoology. Part B, Molecular and developmental evolution
  • 2009
TLDR
Growth series of all ten modern salamander families were examined for pattern and timing of vertebral elements chondrification and ossification and suggests that the developmental pattern switch occurred between the Triassic and the mid-Jurassic before the last major radiation.
Late Jurassic salamandroid from western Liaoning, China
  • K. Gao, N. Shubin
  • Geography
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 2012
TLDR
A Jurassic salamander, Beiyanerpeton jianpingensis (gen. et sp. nov.), from a recently found site in western Liaoning Province, China is the earliest known record of Salamandroidea, and provides direct evidence supporting the hypothesis that the split between Cryptobranchoidea and Salamandroidesa had taken placed before the Late Jurassic Oxfordian time.
A neotenic salamander, Jeholotriton paradoxus, from the Daohugou Beds in Inner Mongolia
TLDR
It is discovered that the fossil Kokartus (family Karauridae) and the living hynobiids (the most primitive group of modern salamanders) Ranodon sibiricus and Hynobius maculosus, as well as Dicamptodontidae tenebrosus all share some similarities with Jeholotriton, however, conclusive relationships could not be confidently established because of the unique combination of mature and larval characteristics.
A new hynobiid-like salamander (Amphibia, Urodela) from Inner Mongolia, China, provides a rare case study of developmental features in an Early Cretaceous fossil urodele
TLDR
Comparison of adult with larval and postmetamorphic juvenile specimens provides insights into developmental patterns of cranial and postcranial skeletons in this fossil species, especially resorption of the palatine and anterior portions of thePalatopterygoids in the palate and the coronoid in the mandible during metamorphosis, and post metamorphic ossification of the mesopodium in both manus and pes.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 58 REFERENCES
Late Jurassic salamanders from northern China
TLDR
The discovery of an extraordinary sample of salamander fossils from the Upper Jurassic of China is reported, providing compelling evidence for an Asian origin of Recent salamanders, as well as for an extensive and early radiation of several major lineages.
A metamorphosed salamander from the Early Cretaceous of Las Hoyas, Spain
TLDR
Valdotriton is a relatively plesiomorphic member of the Urodela (crown-group salamanders), but more derived than the Sirenidae and Cryptobranchoidea, in that it possesses a single ossification in place of the prearticular and angular.
Evolutionary History of Lorisiform Primates
TLDR
By specializing on two different foraging modes early in their radiation, lorisines and galagines subsequently underwent a chain of integrated evolutionary changes eventually having an impact on many components of locomotor behavior, anatomy, physiology, reproduction, life history, and social behavior.
A NEW SALAMANDER (AMPHIBIA: CAUDATA) FROM THE EARLY CRETACEOUS JEHOL BIOTA
TLDR
The discovery of Jeholotriton documents the third Mesozoic salamander from China and differs from other early caudates in having an anteromedially directed ramus of pterygoid that connects to the skull table rather than the maxilla.
Cryptobranchid Salamanders from the Paleocene and Miocene of Saskatchewan
TLDR
A new species of Cryptobranchus from the upper Paleocene Ravenscrag Formation (Tiffanian) of Saskatchewan is represented by dentaries, fragmentary maxillae, parts of two vertebrae, and a partial exoccipital, indicating an hypothesis of ancestry of the new species to later cryptobranchids.
Ancient single origin for Malagasy primates.
TLDR
It is concluded that primate origins were marked by rapid speciation and diversification sometime before the late Paleocene, and called for a revision of primate classifications in which the dwarf and mouse lemurs are placed within the Afro-Asian lorisiforms.
Discovery of Two Kinds of Protofeathered Pterosaurs in the Mesozoic Daohugou Biota in the Ningcheng Region and Its Stratigraphic and Biologic Significances
In the vicinity of Daohugou village of the Ningcheng region, Inner Mongolia is exposed a series of Mesozoic lacustrine strata intercalated with a set of acidic volcanic rocks, from the upper part of
A Fossil Lemur from the Oligocene of Pakistan
TLDR
The discovery of a strepsirrhine fossil with strong cheirogaleid lemur affinities from early Oligocene deposits of the Bugti Hills (Balochistan, Pakistan) represents the earliest record of Lemuriformes, which hence appear to have already diversified outside of Madagascar at least 30 million years ago.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...