Earliest hominin occupation of Sulawesi, Indonesia

@article{Bergh2016EarliestHO,
  title={Earliest hominin occupation of Sulawesi, Indonesia},
  author={Gerrit D. van den Bergh and Bo Li and Adam Brumm and Rainer Gr{\"u}n and Dida Yurnaldi and Mark W Moore and Iwan Kurniawan and Ruly Setiawan and Fachroel Aziz and Richard G. Roberts and Suyono and Michael A. Storey and Erick Setiabudi and Michael J. Morwood},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016},
  volume={529},
  pages={208-211}
}
Sulawesi is the largest and oldest island within Wallacea, a vast zone of oceanic islands separating continental Asia from the Pleistocene landmass of Australia and Papua (Sahul). By one million years ago an unknown hominin lineage had colonized Flores immediately to the south, and by about 50 thousand years ago, modern humans (Homo sapiens) had crossed to Sahul. On the basis of position, oceanic currents and biogeographical context, Sulawesi probably played a pivotal part in these dispersals… Expand
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