Earliest Modern Bandicoot and Bilby (Marsupialia, Peramelidae, and Thylacomyidae) from the Miocene of the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, Northwestern Queensland, Australia

@inproceedings{Travouillon2014EarliestMB,
  title={Earliest Modern Bandicoot and Bilby (Marsupialia, Peramelidae, and Thylacomyidae) from the Miocene of the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, Northwestern Queensland, Australia},
  author={Kenny J. Travouillon and Suzanne J. Hand and Michael Archer and Karen Black},
  year={2014}
}
ABSTRACT Recent molecular phylogenies of peramelemorphians suggest that thylacomyids (bilbies) and peramelids (modern bandicoots) diversified sometime in the late Oligocene or early Miocene. Until now, however, the earliest fossil evidence of thylacomyids and peramelids was from the Australian Pliocene. Here we describe the oldest peramelid and thylacomyid from the middle Miocene of the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, northwestern Queensland. The peramelid, Crash bandicoot, gen. et sp. nov… 
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