Earliest Evolution of Multituberculate Mammals Revealed by a New Jurassic Fossil

@article{Yuan2013EarliestEO,
  title={Earliest Evolution of Multituberculate Mammals Revealed by a New Jurassic Fossil},
  author={Chongxi Yuan and Qiang Ji and Qingjin Meng and Alan R. Tabrum and Zhe‐Xi Luo},
  journal={Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={341},
  pages={779 - 783}
}
Early Multi Multituberculate mammals (multis) first arose in the Jurassic and became extinct in the Oligocene, a span of over 100 million years, which makes them the longest-living order of mammals known. This highly diverse and abundant group filled many niches occupied by today's similarly diverse rodents. Multis are known for their complex dentition and unique locomotor adaptations, which facilitated their divergence into a suite of ecosystems. Yuan et al. (p. 779) describe a new basal multi… 
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