Earliest Evidence for Ground-Edge Axes: 35,400±410 cal BP from Jawoyn Country, Arnhem Land

@article{Geneste2010EarliestEF,
  title={Earliest Evidence for Ground-Edge Axes: 35,400±410 cal BP from Jawoyn Country, Arnhem Land},
  author={J. Geneste and B. David and H. Plisson and Chris Clarkson and J. Delannoy and F. Petchey and R. Whear},
  journal={Australian Archaeology},
  year={2010},
  volume={71},
  pages={66 - 69}
}
Abstract Evidence for the world’s earliest stone tools dates to 3.4 million years ago and pre-dates the earliest known Homo species in eastern Africa. However ground-edged tools did not appear until the dispersal of cognitively fully modern Homo sapiens sapiens out of Africa. We report on the discovery of the earliest securely dated ground-edge implement in the world at Nawarla Gabarnmang (northern Australia). The fragment of ground-edge axe is sandwiched between four statistically… Expand
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