EXTRAOCULAR PHOTORECEPTION IN AMPHIBIANS

@article{Adler1976EXTRAOCULARPI,
  title={EXTRAOCULAR PHOTORECEPTION IN AMPHIBIANS},
  author={Kraig Adler},
  journal={Photochemistry and Photobiology},
  year={1976},
  volume={23}
}
  • K. Adler
  • Published 1976
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Photochemistry and Photobiology
Abstract— Amphibians possess extraocular photoreceptors (EOPs) which exclusively or together with the lateral eyes perceive light for various physiological and behavioral activities. Several kinds of EOPs are discussed but emphasis is given to the pineal complex: the dermal frontal organ (or stirnorgan) found only in frogs and toads among amphibians and the intracranial pineal body (or epiphysis cerebri) found in all Amphibia. Both structures are derived as dorsal evaginations of the… Expand
Pineal eye and behaviour in Xenopus tadpoles
TLDR
Evidence presented here indicates that the pineal eye can initiate swimming when the illumination is dimmed, and in young tadpoles of the clawed toad, pineal photoreceptors seem to be responsible for a simple escape response. Expand
Extraretinal mediation of responses to temperature and light in hatchling alligators
TLDR
This is the first demonstration that extraretinal photoreception is involved in the mediation of temperature dependent light responses and the temperature dependence of phototactic orientation is eliminated. Expand
The pineal body: Site of extraocular perception of celestial cues for orientation in the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum)
TLDR
These data strongly support the hypothesis that the pineal body is an effective extraocular photoreceptor (EOP) for compass orientation in tiger salamanders. Expand
Neurobiological aspects of extraretinal photoreceptive systems: structure and function
TLDR
EOP's present us with problems relating to the mechanisms of phototransduction and their morphological and anatomical organization, and in two cases, a detailed study at the cellular level has recently become possible: the photoreceptive neurones of the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia and the pineal and parietal organs of lower vertebrates. Expand
Visual pigment in fish iridocytes
The iridophores of some fishes including the neon tetra, Paracheirodon innesi, contain regular alternating layers of guanine and cytoplasm whose spacing changes in response to light1–3, even inExpand
EXTRARETINAL PHOTORECEPTION IN BIRDS
TLDR
In this review, the variety of extraretinally‐mediated responses has been described, and the physiological properties and anatomical location ofExtraretinal photoreceptors have been briefly discussed, to deepen the understanding of its place in the sensory armamentarium. Expand
Vertebrate circadian rhythms: Retinal and extraretinal photoreception
Both the pineal and the SCN are elements of the vertebrate multioscillator system although the relative importance of these 2 areas probably varies between, and possibly within, the differentExpand
Melatonin and thyroxine: Influence on compass orientation in salamanders
TLDR
Administration of pulses of exogenous melatonin at noon, but not serotonin or thyroxine, caused the larvae to shift their directional response about 90° clockwise, consistent with the view that melatonin pulses mimic “lights-on” and act to phase-delay the animal's endogenous timekeeping mechanism. Expand
Ecological Niche Dimensions and Sensory Functions in Amphibians
TLDR
This chapter on amphibians will compare and contrast the primary sensory modes utilized by anurans and caudates, and the modes emphasized by each Order are viewed as adaptations to several ecological constraints on information transmission. Expand
The Extraretinal Eyelet of Drosophila: Development, Ultrastructure, and Putative Circadian Function
TLDR
It is demonstrated that eyelet derives from the 12 photoreceptors of Bolwig's organ, which entrain circadian rhythmicity in the larva, and a functional role in circadian entrainment first found in Bolwig’s organ in the Larva is retained in eyelet, the adult remnant ofbolwig's organs, even in the face of metamorphic restructuring. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 89 REFERENCES
The Role of Extraoptic Photoreceptors in Amphibian Rhythms and Orientation: A Review
Amphibians possess extraoptic photoreceptors (EOPs) which can be used to perceive light for certain physiological and behavioral activities including pigmentary adaptation, entrainment andExpand
The Parietal Eye (Pineal and Parietal Organs) of Lower Vertebrates
TLDR
This work has shown that within the order of vertebrates some lower classes including fishes, amphibians and reptiles possess photosensitive structures within the epiphyseal complex deriving ontogenetically from the diencephalon. Expand
PHOTORECEPTORS IN THE AMPHIBIAN FRONTAL ORGAN.
  • R. M. Eakin
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1961
TLDR
This study of the frontal organ in the tadpole of the Pacific Treefrog, Hyla regilla, indicates that it is photoreceptive, and evidence of light sensitivity is needed before the cells which bear them are designated photoreceptors. Expand
Endocrinology of the amphibian pineal.
TLDR
Strong evidence is presented that melatonin is a hormone that normally regulates body blanching and that the effects of melatonin are at the effector cell level rather than at either the hypothalamus or the pituitary. Expand
EXTRARETINAL PHOTORECEFTION IN INSECTS
TLDR
Extraretinal photoreceptors are widespread among insects and function in the photoperiodic control of development and in the entrainment of circadian rhythms, and in all studies to date they appear to be associated with the cerebral lobe region of the brain. Expand
EXTRARETINAL PHOTORECEPTION IN BIRDS
TLDR
In this review, the variety of extraretinally‐mediated responses has been described, and the physiological properties and anatomical location ofExtraretinal photoreceptors have been briefly discussed, to deepen the understanding of its place in the sensory armamentarium. Expand
ULTRASTRUCTURE AND DEVELOPMENT OF AMPHIBIAN PINEAL ORGANS.
  • D. E. Kelly
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Progress in brain research
  • 1965
TLDR
Observations support the hypothesis that the organ differentiates in a progressive fashion as new cells are supplied to it from a proliferation zone in the pineal neck connecting with the brain roof as well as the possibility of secondary functions, such as secretion, in view of this evidence. Expand
Extra-optic photoreception and compass orientation in larval and adult salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum).
  • D. Taylor
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Animal behaviour
  • 1972
TLDR
Tiger salamanders show a directional preference toward deep water as larvae but toward land after metamorphosis and an internal biological clock exists in this species. Expand
HISTOLOGICAL STRUCTURE AND CYTOLOGY OF THE PINEAL COMPLEX IN FISHES, AMPHIBIANS AND REPTILES.
This chapter compares the histological and cytological structures of the pineal complex in fishes, amphibians, and reptiles to connect the light-optic data with the electron-optic information andExpand
SURVEY OF THE INNERVATION OF THE EPIPHYSIS CEREBRI AND THE ACCESSORY PINEAL ORGANS OF VERTEBRATES.
This chapter discusses the data available on the innervation of the epiphysis and the accessory pineal organs in different vertebrate classes, such as fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. In mostExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...