EXPANDING GEOGRAPHICAL RANGE OF CACTOBLASTIS CACTORUM (LEPIDOPTERA: PYRALIDAE) IN NORTH AMERICA

@inproceedings{Hight2002EXPANDINGGR,
  title={EXPANDING GEOGRAPHICAL RANGE OF CACTOBLASTIS CACTORUM (LEPIDOPTERA: PYRALIDAE) IN NORTH AMERICA},
  author={S. Hight and J. Carpenter and K. Bloem and S. Bloem and R. Pemberton and P. Stiling},
  year={2002}
}
Paraiso et al . : Egg Parasitoids of the Cactus Moth 81 EGG PARASITOIDS ATTACKING CACTOBLASTIS CACTORUM ( LEPIDOPTERA : PYRALIDAE ) IN NORTH FLORIDA
Interest in the natural enemies of Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg) has increased since the moth was found in Florida in 1989. Previous surveys for natural enemies in Argentina identified egg parasitoidsExpand
Niches and distributional areas: Concepts, methods, and assumptions
TLDR
It is argued that conceptual clarity is enhanced by adopting restricted definitions of “niche” that enable operational definitions of basic concepts like fundamental, potential, and realized niches and potential and actual distributional areas to be applied to the question of niche conservatism. Expand
Tracing an Invasion: Phylogeography of Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in the United States Based on Mitochondrial DNA
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Analysis of phylogeography of C. cactorum populations from Australia, South Africa, Hawaii, the Caribbean, Mexico, and the southeastern United States indicates that dispersal by commercial import action and human transport may be more important than flight ranges of ovipositing females for determining long range expansion of the species. Expand
Insect conservation: a synthetic management approach.
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  • 2007
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There are six basic principles that are interrelated and together provide guidelines for synthetic conservation management of insects that require the combined support of the metapopulation trio of large patch (habitat) size, good patch quality, and reduced patch isolation. Expand
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The relationships of RGR and fruit production with precipitation suggest that precipitation serves as a cue in determining the trade‐off in the allocation of resources to growth or fruit production, and may help explain why the impact of herbivory can vary greatly across space and time. Expand
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The use of Trichogramma wasps as an inundative biological control agent, complementary to the Sterile Insect Technique application, is discussed. Expand
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TLDR
It appears that biological control of O. triacantha and O. stricta persists and these natives have survived 50 years of C. cactorum attack on these small islands, despite fears that the moth could have caused their extinction. Expand
Developing a Sterile Insect Release Program for Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): Effective Overflooding Ratios and Release-Recapture Field Studies
TLDR
Results suggest that an overflooding ratio as low as 5:1 can effectively suppress C. cactorum in field cages and that releasing both genders together is more effective than releasing males only. Expand
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Research on control options is vital as is further work on the rate of spread and impact of Cactoblastis in the United States Southeast, so that the country can be as well prepared as possible to deal with this threat when it arrives in Arizona, California, and Mexico. Expand
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References

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Cactus Caretakers 101 : Monitoring the Endangered Semaphore Cactus , Opunita coralli - cola
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Protecting rare Florida cacti from attack by the exotic cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)
TLDR
The most successful conservation strategy for O. corallicola thus appears to be outplanting in the shade, possibly in tropical hammocks, far away from Opuntia cacti that might contain Cactoblastis. Expand
DISTRIBUTION AND DISPERSAL OF CACTOBLASTIS CACTORUM (LEPIDOPTERA: PYRALIDAE), AN EXOTIC OPUNTIA-FEEDING MOTH, IN FLORIDA
TLDR
The recent arrival of Cactoblastis cactorum Berg in Florida has raised concern for Florida's native Opuntia cacti, and over time there may expect to see a reduction in the number of plants as a result of an increase in the mortality rate of recruits. Expand
RAPD ANALYSIS OF THE LAST POPULATION OF A LIKELY FLORIDA KEYS ENDEMIC CACTUS
The semaphore cactus in the Florida Keys bus until recently been considered a disjunct location of the Jamaican Opuntia spinosissima. Loss of all but one population in the Keys coupled with recentExpand
The biological control of cactus weeds: achievements and prospects.
The biological campaign against prickly-pear