EVOLUTIONARY MISMATCH, NEURAL REWARD CIRCUITS, AND PATHOLOGICAL GAMBLING

@article{Spinella2003EVOLUTIONARYMN,
  title={EVOLUTIONARY MISMATCH, NEURAL REWARD CIRCUITS, AND PATHOLOGICAL GAMBLING},
  author={Marcello Spinella},
  journal={International Journal of Neuroscience},
  year={2003},
  volume={113},
  pages={503 - 512}
}
  • M. Spinella
  • Published 1 January 2003
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • International Journal of Neuroscience
Evolutionary mismatch theory has been applied to disorders of self-regulation such as maladaptive eating patterns and drug abuse. Modern gambling represents a refinement of the elements of risk and chance, which draw upon the faculties of judgment and novelty-seeking. A set of neuroanatomical structures, including prefrontal-subcortical systems and associated limbic structures, have been implicated in the processing of reward and punishment, including gambling-related situations… 
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