EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY OF THE PARROTFISHES: BIOGEOGRAPHY, ECOMORPHOLOGY, AND COMPARATIVE DIVERSITY

@inproceedings{Streelman2002EVOLUTIONARYHO,
  title={EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY OF THE PARROTFISHES: BIOGEOGRAPHY, ECOMORPHOLOGY, AND COMPARATIVE DIVERSITY},
  author={J. Todd Streelman and Monica Alfaro and Mark W. Westneat and David R. Bellwood and Stephen A. Karl},
  booktitle={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={2002}
}
Abstract The family Scaridae comprises about 90 species of herbivorous coral reef, rock reef, and seagrass fishes. Parrotfishes are important agents of marine bioerosion who rework the substrate with their beaklike oral jaws. Many scarid populations are characterized by complex social systems including highly differentiated sexual stages, territoriality, and the defense of harems. Here, we test a hypothesis of relationships among parrotfish genera derived from nearly 2 kb of nuclear and… 

Influence of sexual selection and feeding functional morphology on diversification rate of parrotfishes (Scaridae)

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It is found that several parrotfish clades exhibit the highest diversification rates among all labrid lineages, and a rate shift is pinpointed at the shared ancestor of Scarus and Chlorurus, a scarid subclade characterized by territorial behaviour and strong sexual dichromatism, suggesting that sexual selection was a major factor in parrot fish diversification.

Patterns and processes in the evolutionary history of parrotfishes (Family Labridae)

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Phylogenetic reconstruction of the evolutionary relationships among 61 of the 70 species of the parrotfish genera Chlorurus and Scarus based on mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences retrieved 15 well-supported clades with mid Pliocene/Pleistocene diversification, finding little evidence that a single dominant process has driven diversification and detecting a pattern of discrete, sequential stages of diversification in relation to habitat, ecology, and reproductive biology.

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...

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