EVOLUTION OF VIVIPARITY: A PHYLOGENETIC TEST OF THE COLD‐CLIMATE HYPOTHESIS IN PHRYNOSOMATID LIZARDS

@article{Lambert2013EVOLUTIONOV,
  title={EVOLUTION OF VIVIPARITY: A PHYLOGENETIC TEST OF THE COLD‐CLIMATE HYPOTHESIS IN PHRYNOSOMATID LIZARDS},
  author={Shea M Lambert and John J. Wiens},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2013},
  volume={67}
}
The evolution of viviparity is a key life‐history transition in vertebrates, but the selective forces favoring its evolution are not fully understood. With >100 origins of viviparity, squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are ideal for addressing this issue. Some evidence from field and laboratory studies supports the “cold‐climate” hypothesis, wherein viviparity provides an advantage in cold environments by allowing mothers to maintain higher temperatures for developing embryos. Surprisingly… 

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  • 2021
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...

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