EVOLUTION OF POLYGAMY IN THE LONG‐BILLED MARSH WREN

@article{Verner1964EVOLUTIONOP,
  title={EVOLUTION OF POLYGAMY IN THE LONG‐BILLED MARSH WREN},
  author={Jared Verner},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={1964},
  volume={18}
}
Evolution of polygyny in a species whose young require parental care, to which the male can contribute directly, presents certain interesting problems. With each additional mate, the male may have more young to care for simultaneously; less time being devoted to each may influence their survival. Even if polygamy increases the male's total contribution to future generations, as compared to monogamy, the reverse would probably be true for each of the females mated to him. Since it is generally… Expand
The Evolution of Mating Systems in Grouse
TLDR
The intent of this paper is to examine Wiley's (1974) hypothesis and present an alternative based on the assumption that female choice determines the evolution of grouse mating systems, which reverses the usually accepted causal relationship between delayed breeding and polygamy. Expand
Polygyny in the Dickcissel
TLDR
Researchers undertook studies in Kansas from the middle of May to the end of August, 1965, to determine the mating patterns of the Dickcissel and the poissible adaptive significance of polygyny in the populations being investigated. Expand
POPULATION DYNAMICS OF INDIGO BUNTINGS AND THE EVOLUTION OF AVIAN POLYGYNY
  • M. Carey, V. Nolan
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1979
TLDR
The objective was to test the model's ability to predict polygyny in a population of an altricial bird species whose mating system was unknown and the indigo bunting was selected as the subject. Expand
Passerine Polygyny: A Role for Parasites?
  • A. Read
  • Biology
  • The American Naturalist
  • 1991
TLDR
It is shown for European and North American passerine birds that the proportion of individuals infected with blood parasites is significantly lower in polygynous species than it is in monogamous species, suggesting that parasitic infection should be considered as a factor influencing passerine mating systems whichever way the causal arrow goes. Expand
Polygyny in the tree swallowTachycineta bicolor: a result of the cost of searching for an unmated male
TLDR
It is suggested that a mate-search cost is leading to the few cases of polygamous males: in a short-lived bird with a short breeding season, the cost to females of searching for a more dedicated male is the risk of not breeding at all. Expand
The evolution of monogamy and concealed ovulation in humans
TLDR
The loss of estrus in the female is regarded not as a precondition to pair-bonding, but as a means for increasing the likelihood of successful cuckoldry of the male after monogamy has been established. Expand
FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO MALE MATING SUCCESS IN THE POLYGYNOUS DUSKY WARBLER (PHYLLOSCOPUS FUSCATUS)
TLDR
Analysis of extra-pair paternity showed that females did not prefer to copulate with males that were most successful in competition over territories, Nevertheless, polygynous males, on average, sired 3.4 times more offspring than monogamous males. Expand
Evolution of polygyny in the ancestors of Red-winged Blackbirds
TLDR
The reconstruction suggests that the closest non-polygynous an- cestor of Red-winged Blackbirds was characterized by monogamy, male territoriality, equal sharing of parental care between the sexes, and terrestrial breeding. Expand
Nest Predation Lowers the Polygyny Threshold: A New Compensation Model
TLDR
A model is presented showing that the rate of nest losses, in the range normally found among passerines, might favor the fitness of secondary females more than that of monogamous females, thus decreasing the cost of selecting mated males. Expand
Bill morphology reflects female independence from male parental help
TLDR
It is argued that females with stronger bills are better adapted to exploit the abundance of large food items in rich territories and thus to raise young on their own and provide evidence for an extended version of the ‘constrained–female hypothesis’. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 33 REFERENCES
Territorial Behavior: The Main Controlling Factor of a Local Song Sparrow Population
IT has been shown frequently that territories are compressible. It is also known that the average territory size for a species in a given area may be significantly influenced by local conditions.Expand
The ecology of blackbird (Agelaius) social systems.
TLDR
All features of social systems are considered to be the products of natural selection just as are any physiological or morphological adaptations. Expand
The Genetical Theory of Natural Selection
PROBABLY most geneticists to-day are some-what sceptical as to the value of the mathematical treatment of their problems. With the deepest respect, and even awe, for that association of complexExpand
BREEDING BEHAVIOR OF THE BREWER BLACKBIRD
TLDR
Results are reported of a behavior study of the Brewer Blackbird in which color bands were used extensively in a nesting colony at the mouth of the Carmel River, Monterey County, California. Expand
Helpers at the Nest
TLDR
There are many species in which the mated pair are not so exclusive in their territory, and as a result of this, coupled with other peculiar circumstances, receive more or less assistance in the duties of the nest. Expand
The Kirtland's Warbler
TLDR
The relative importance of certain physical and biotic components of the environment can be studied best in those species which are currently showing a conspicuous increase or decrease in numbers or in size of geographic range. Expand
The Mechanism of Natural Selection for the Sex Ratio
TLDR
A population model is presented which quantifies and extends the mechanism described by R. A. Fisher for the natural selection of the sex ratio and shows that this mechanism can affect the mean of a population's sex ratio, but not the variance. Expand
Territorial and mating behavior of the house wren, with 32 figures,
"Contribution from the Baldwin Bird Research Laboratory, no. 37 and from the Zoological laboratory of the University of Illinois, no. 582."
Life History of the Black Rosy Finch
.. . . .. ..... ... . ... . .. .. . ... . . ......... .~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. .. .. ... .. ... .. . ....... . ... ...... . . . :... ....... .... .. .. . . . ... ... -~~~~~~~~~~~~AmericanExpand
Bird Song
A Study of Bird SongBy Edward A. Armstrong. Pp. xv+335+16 plates. (London: Oxford University Press, 1963.) 45s. net.
...
1
2
3
4
...