EVERY PLANAR MAP IS FOUR COLORABLE

@article{Wilson1991EVERYPM,
  title={EVERY PLANAR MAP IS FOUR COLORABLE},
  author={Robin J. Wilson},
  journal={Bulletin of The London Mathematical Society},
  year={1991},
  volume={23},
  pages={89-90}
}
  • Robin J. Wilson
  • Published 1991
  • Mathematics
  • Bulletin of The London Mathematical Society
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The work presented here has been done with various coauthors. For sake of clarity, I decided to use “we” as subject when a set of coauthors (that varies during the monograph) should be understood.
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