EV-077 in vitro inhibits platelet aggregation in type-2 diabetics on aspirin.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION This study aimed to characterize the in vitro effect of EV-077, a compound that antagonises the binding of prostanoids and isoprostanes to the thromboxane receptor (TP) and inhibits the thromboxane synthase (TS), on platelet aggregation of patients with type-2 diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD) on chronic aspirin treatment. The effect of EV-077 on 8-iso-PGE(2)-mediated TP receptor contraction of human arteries was also investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty-two type-2 diabetics with CAD on chronic aspirin (100 mg) treatment were studied. Arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation was measured by impedance aggregometry in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood anticoagulated with hirudin, and by light transmission aggregometry in citrate-anticoagulated PRP following 10-min in vitro exposure to EV-077 (100 nmol/l) or control. The effect of EV-077 was measured on isometric contraction of 24 human umbilical arteries induced by isoprostane 8-iso-PGE(2). RESULTS Arachidonic acid (1 mmol/l) induced substantial aggregation in hirudin-anticoagulated whole blood (63 ± 4 AU), which was significantly reduced by in vitro exposure to EV-077 (38 ± 3 AU, P<0.001). Virtually no arachidonic acid-induced aggregation in citrate-anticoagulated or hirudin-anticoagulated PRP was observed. EV-077 potently, competitively and reversibly inhibited TP mediated contraction of umbilical arteries by 8-iso-PGE(2) (P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS Aspirin did not completely inhibit arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood from type-2 diabetics with CAD. This aggregation is likely induced by prostanoids and/or isoprostanes produced by leukocytes, because it was significantly reduced by EV-077. The TP receptor-mediated contraction of human arteries induced by isoprostane 8-iso-PGE(2) was effectively inhibited by EV-077.

DOI: 10.1016/j.thromres.2012.08.309

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