ETHNOGRAPHY IN CAESAR'S GALLIC WAR AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR COMPOSITION

@article{Creer2019ETHNOGRAPHYIC,
  title={ETHNOGRAPHY IN CAESAR'S GALLIC WAR AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR COMPOSITION},
  author={Tyler Creer},
  journal={The Classical Quarterly},
  year={2019},
  volume={69},
  pages={246 - 263}
}
  • Tyler Creer
  • Published 1 May 2019
  • History
  • The Classical Quarterly
After long neglect, in English-language scholarship at least, the question of how Julius Caesar wrote and disseminated his Gallic War—as a single work? in multi-year chunks? year by year?—was revived by T.P. Wiseman in 1998, who argued anew for serial composition. This paper endeavours to provide further evidence for that conclusion by examining how Caesar depicts the non-Roman peoples he fights. Caesar's ethnographic passages, and their authorship, have been a point of contention among German… Expand
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