ETHICAL AND DATA‐INTEGRITY PROBLEMS IN THE SECOND LANCET SURVEY OF MORTALITY IN IRAQ

@article{Spagat2010ETHICALAD,
  title={ETHICAL AND DATA‐INTEGRITY PROBLEMS IN THE SECOND LANCET SURVEY OF MORTALITY IN IRAQ},
  author={Michael Spagat},
  journal={Defence and Peace Economics},
  year={2010},
  volume={21},
  pages={1 - 41}
}
  • M. Spagat
  • Published 1 February 2010
  • Economics
  • Defence and Peace Economics
This paper considers the second Lancet survey of mortality in Iraq published in October 2006. It presents some evidence suggesting ethical violations to the survey’s respondents including endangerment, privacy breaches and violations in obtaining informed consent. Breaches of minimal disclosure standards examined include non‐disclosure of the survey’s questionnaire, data‐entry form, data matching anonymised interviewer identifications with households and sample design. The paper also presents… 
MAINSTREAMING AN OUTLIER: THE QUEST TO CORROBORATE THE SECOND LANCET SURVEY OF MORTALITY IN IRAQ
TLDR
The second Lancet survey is inconsistent with all credible and relevant information on levels and trends in violent deaths and on the geographical distribution of violence, including data from the first and second Lancet surveys.
Conflict Deaths in Iraq: A Methodological Critique of the ORB Survey Estimate
In September of 2007 ORB, a British opinion polling firm, released an estimate that 1.2 million Iraqis had been killed in the conflict, subsequently lowering its estimate to 1 million. We compare
Numbers Count: Dead Bodies, Statistics, and the Politics of Armed Conflicts
This strategic analysis of the body count introduces a general discussion on the measurement of war violence and excess mortality, its treatment by the media, humanitarian organisations, governments
The ethics of security research. An ethics framework for contemporary security studies
TLDR
This effort brings together an existing but fragmented literature and builds upon the authors’ own experiences in several subfields and schools of “hands-on” research on security and political violence to offer a framework for ethical assessment.
Estimating War Deaths
In a much-cited recent article, Obermeyer, Murray, and Gakidou (2008a) examine estimates of wartime fatalities from injuries for thirteen countries. Their analysis poses a major challenge to the
Accounting for Civilian Casualties: From the Past to the Future
Assessment of the extent of civilian casualties during times of conflict presents significant challenges in data collection, quantitative methods, interpretation, and presentation. In this article,
Using Power Laws to Estimate Conflict Size
Casualty counts are often controversial, and thorough research can only go so far in resolving such debates—there will almost always be missing data, and thus, a need to draw inferences about how
Assessing Freedom of Movement for Counterinsurgency Campaigns
Abstract : This report examines the ways in which military staffs might assess freedom of movement within the framework of a counterinsurgency (COIN) campaign assessment. The RAND Corporation has
Empirical essays on public and media attitudes to conflict
The lens through which people observe and form judgements upon conflict and terrorism depends heavily on the media they consume as well as their personal circumstances. This thesis is comprised of
Who Takes the Blame? The Strategic Effects of Collateral Damage
Can civilians caught in civil wars reward and punish armed actors for their behavior? If so, do armed actors reap strategic benefits from treating civilians well and pay for treating them poorly?
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 85 REFERENCES
Mortality after the 2003 invasion of Iraq: Were valid and ethical field methods used in this survey?
TLDR
The problems presented by this reported rapid interviewing rate are described: inadequacy of the timeframe, likely compromise to data validity, increased risk to interviewees, and the improbability of maintaining ethical standards for academic epidemiological research.
Violence-related mortality in Iraq from 2002 to 2006.
TLDR
Results from the Iraq Family Health Survey provide new evidence on mortality in Iraq and point to a massive death toll, only one of the many health and human consequences of an ongoing humanitarian crisis.
Iraq War mortality estimates: A systematic review
TLDR
The mortality burden of the war and its sequelae on Iraq is large and there is a pressing need to promote sound epidemiologic approaches to determining mortality estimates and to establish guidelines for policy-makers, the media and the public on how to interpret these estimates.
Counting the dead in Iraq
  • K. McPherson
  • Political Science
    BMJ : British Medical Journal
  • 2005
TLDR
Neither the public nor public health professionals are able to obtain reliable and officially endorsed information about the extent of civilian deaths attributable to the allied invasion of Iraq, and public access to reliable data on mortality is important.
Mortality in Iraq
Mortality in Iraq – Authors' reply
Mortality after the 2003 invasion of Iraq: a cross-sectional cluster sample survey
War and mortality in Kosovo, 1998–99: an epidemiological testimony
Iraqi Death Estimates Called Too High; Methods Faulted
TLDR
A new estimate of the number of Iraqis who have died as a consequence of the U.S. invasion in March 2003 has ignited a firestorm of its own and is at least 10 times higher than estimates cited by the Iraqi government and U.s-led coalition.
...
...