ESTIMATING THE RISK OF CATTLE EXPOSURE TO TUBERCULOSIS POSED BY WILD DEER RELATIVE TO BADGERS IN ENGLAND AND WALES

@inproceedings{Ward2009ESTIMATINGTR,
  title={ESTIMATING THE RISK OF CATTLE EXPOSURE TO TUBERCULOSIS POSED BY WILD DEER RELATIVE TO BADGERS IN ENGLAND AND WALES},
  author={Alastair I. Ward and Graham C. Smith and Thomas R. Etherington and Richard J. Delahay},
  booktitle={Journal of wildlife diseases},
  year={2009}
}
Wild deer populations in Great Britain are expanding in range and probably in numbers, and relatively high prevalence of bovine tuberculosis (bTB, caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis) in deer occurs locally in parts of southwest England. To evaluate the M. bovis exposure risk posed to cattle by wild deer relative to badgers in England and Wales, we constructed and parameterized a quantitative risk model with the use of information from the literature (on deer densities, activity… 
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