ESCRT III repairs nuclear envelope ruptures during cell migration to limit DNA damage and cell death

@article{Raab2016ESCRTIR,
  title={ESCRT III repairs nuclear envelope ruptures during cell migration to limit DNA damage and cell death},
  author={Matthew Raab and Matteo Gentili and Henry de Belly and Hawa Racine Thiam and Pablo Vargas and Ana Joaquina Jim{\'e}nez and Franziska Lautenschlaeger and Rapha{\"e}l Voituriez and Ana-Mar{\'i}a Lennon-Dum{\'e}nil and Nicolas Manel and Matthieu Piel},
  journal={Science},
  year={2016},
  volume={352},
  pages={359 - 362}
}
Repairing tears in the nuclear envelope The nuclear envelope segregates genomic DNA from the cytoplasm and regulates protein trafficking between the cytosol and the nucleus. Maintaining nuclear envelope integrity during interphase is considered crucial. However, Raab et al. and Denais et al. show that migrating immune and cancer cells experience frequent and transitory nuclear envelope ruptures when they move through tight spaces (see the Perspective by Burke). The nuclear envelope reseals… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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BAF facilitates interphase nuclear envelope repair through recruitment of nuclear transmembrane proteins
Nuclear membrane rupture during interphase occurs in a variety of cell contexts, both healthy and pathological. In the primary nucleus, membrane ruptures are rapidly repaired but the mechanisms areExpand
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TLDR
Barrier-to-Autointegration Factor (BAF), a DNA-binding protein involved in post-mitotic NE reformation and cytosolic viral regulation, is identified as an essential protein for nuclear rupture repair. Expand
Unrestrained ESCRT-III drives chromosome fragmentation and micronuclear catastrophe
TLDR
It is proposed that the ESCRT-III nuclear integrity surveillance machinery is a double-edged sword, as its exquisite sensitivity ensures rapid repair at primary nuclei while causing unrestrained polymerization at micronuclei, with catastrophic consequences for genome stability16-18. Expand
Nuclear envelope dysfunction and its contribution to the aging process
TLDR
The identification of molecular mechanisms underlying NE dysfunction, including upstream and downstream events, which have yet to be unraveled, will be determinant not only to the understanding of several pathologies, but as here discussed, in the aging process. Expand
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Investigation of mammalian tumor cell migration in confining microenvironments in vitro and in vivo indicates that cell migration incurs substantial physical stress on the NE and its content and requires efficient NE and DNA damage repair for cell survival. Expand
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