EPS Prize Lecture: Characterizing congenital amusia

@article{Stewart2011EPSPL,
  title={EPS Prize Lecture: Characterizing congenital amusia},
  author={Lauren Stewart},
  journal={Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology},
  year={2011},
  volume={64},
  pages={625 - 638}
}
  • L. Stewart
  • Published 14 March 2011
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
The ability to make sense of the music in our environment involves sophisticated cognitive mechanisms that, for most people, are acquired effortlessly and in early life. A special population of individuals, with a disorder termed congenital amusia, report lifelong difficulties in this regard. Exploring the nature of this developmental disorder provides a window onto the cognitive architecture of typical musical processing, as well as allowing a study of the relationship between processing of… Expand
Congenital amusias.
TLDR
Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Expand
Impaired short-term memory for pitch in congenital amusia
TLDR
Findings show that short-term memory deficits in congenital amusia are specific to pitch, suggesting a pitch-memory system that is, at least partly, separated from verbal memory. Expand
Musical familiarity in congenital amusia: Evidence from a gating paradigm
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The findings reveal that amusic individuals have stored musical pieces in long-term memory (LTM), and suggest that congenital amusia might impair conscious access to music processing rather than music processing per se. Expand
Preserved Statistical Learning of Tonal and Linguistic Material in Congenital Amusia
TLDR
Analysis of binary confidence ratings revealed that amusic individuals have less confidence in their abilities and that their performance in learning tasks may not be contingent on explicit knowledge formation or level of awareness to the degree shown in typical individuals. Expand
Perception of musical timbre in congenital amusia: Categorization, discrimination and short-term memory
TLDR
Findings add to the emerging picture of amusia as a disorder that has consequences for the perception and memory of musical timbre, as well as pitch, by probing discrimination and short-term memory for real-world timbral stimuli and examining the ability of individuals to sort instrumental tones according to their timbral similarity. Expand
Discrimination of tonal and atonal music in congenital amusia: The advantage of implicit tasks
TLDR
Findings suggest that congenital amusia might be related to a disorder of the conscious access to music processing rather than music processing per se. Expand
Behavioral and neurophysiological correlates of auditory perception and memory : evidence from congenital amusia
The aim of this PhD thesis is to further our understanding about how humans perceive and nmemorize complex sound structures. We investigated the behavioral and cerebral correlates of auditoryExpand
Pre-attentive processing of neutral and emotional sounds in congenital amusia
TLDR
Electroencephalography results showed some preserved automatic detection of emotional deviance in amusia despite an early deficit to process subtle acoustic changes, which provides further understanding of the dichotomy between implicit and explicit processing in congenital amusian processing, in particular for vocal stimuli with emotional content. Expand
Emotional prosody in congenital amusia: Impaired and spared processes
TLDR
Amusic individuals had similar recognition of emotion in sentences, but poorer performance in vowels, especially when distinguishing sad and neutral stimuli, further supporting the hypothesis of impaired conscious analysis of pitch and timbre in this neurodevelopmental disorder. Expand
Emotional prosody in congenital amusia: impaired and spared processes
TLDR
Amusic individuals had similar recognition of emotion in sentences, but poorer performance in vowels, especially when distinguishing sad and neutral stimuli, further supporting the hypothesis of impaired conscious analysis of pitch and timbre in this neurodevelopmental disorder. Expand
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References

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TLDR
The results of psychophysical tests show that Monica has severe difficulties with detecting pitch changes, and the data suggest that music-processing difficulties may result from problems in fine-grained discrimination of pitch, much in the same way as many language- processing difficulties arise from deficiencies in auditory temporal resolution. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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